ACADEMICS
College Counseling
Competing at the college or university level can be a rewarding experience, and a high-performing student-athlete may have opportunities to apply to certain colleges because of his or her athletic achievements. The question becomes: “How do I find the best fit for college and athletics AND maximize the potential for a coach to recruit me?”

Navigating the recruitment process can be confusing, and every individual situation is unique and depends on the particular college and sport, as well as the individual’s academic record and level of play. There are, however, general guidelines that apply to all.

List of 3 items.

  • Timetable by Grade Level

    Most students who are recruited to play at the college level have had exposure throughout high-school on out-of-school teams. In some sports (track and field, squash, tennis, golf, swimming), regional and national rankings drive recruiting. Those who play other sports, either exclusively at HRA or on additional club or travel teams, generally send video footage of their play to selected colleges based on the collective advice of their coach and college counselor.
  • Grades 9-10

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  • Grade 11

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List of 2 items.

  • Standardized Testing

    Most students will take the SAT or ACT close to the March date during junior year. Some students (including athletes), however, will take it in January because some coaches like to see scores as soon as possible. The down side of taking the test this early is that a student may still have math and vocabulary to cover in class that will help boost scores. Indeed, students can always take a prep course AFTER taking their initial standardized test. Only the highest scores are taken into account, even if a student takes the test two or three times.
  • Grade 12

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Division I, II, III
Division I and II colleges have scholarships to give away; Division III colleges do not. However, Division III colleges will certainly have slots for athletes and need-based financial aid for those who qualify.
Division I athletics is definitely a lifestyle choice; athletic practices and games will dominate much of a student’s time at college.

Some Division III programs can be as competitive as Division I programs. However, in general, students can have a broader college experience more easily at a Division III college. They can often also entertain the possibility of being a two or possibly three-season athlete.

The Bottom Line
Stay organized, set your priorities, be flexible and communicate often with your coach and your college counselor. In November of your junior year, the college counseling office will give you a lot of information that you should read. Remember that for most athletes—particularly for Division IAA and III, grades, difficulty of courses and test scores remain critically important for admission.

Information adapted from The Potomac School

School Information

739 Academy Lane
Newport News, VA 23602
admissions@hra.org
P: (757) 884-9100  |  F: (757) 884-9137
HRA is accredited through the Virginia Association of Independent Schools, a member of the National Association of Independent Schools and is a National Blue Ribbon School.